People usually do not salute road project planning. It seems widening a roadway brings about grimacing in many who do not want to see increased traffic in their area, stormwater problems or the right-of-way erosion of their property.

However, the project discussed Tuesday in the Greenwood Middle School cafeteria about widening East Ash Street seemed free of some of the traditional angst expressed at such meetings. Although a great many people did not attend the meeting that ran from 4-7 p.m. on Tuesday, those in attendance seemed to walk away with questions answered and feeling free of worry.

It is possible for the public to appreciate road widening projects, despite the nearly guaranteed three years of construction delays on the East Ash Street broadening from Berkeley Boulevard and U.S. 70. Accomplishing this is easy for road engineers when they create a plan that improves traffic flow and makes a thoroughfare safer.

For East Ash Street, a median will be put in rather than a fifth center lane to separate the two lanes each of opposing directional traffic. The speed limit will be set at a comfortable 45 mph. And three roundabouts will replace three intersections. Traffic engineers prefer roundabouts as they eliminate the need for left turns against opposing traffic and reduce the speed at the former intersections to 15 mph as drivers maneuver around the circle.

The plan also calls for a limited increase, if any, of nuisance water that comes from the storms Goldsboro has been known for in the early fall months the past few years and general rainfall throughout the year.

If you missed the meeting Tuesday and would like to know more about the plan, go online to bit.ly/2W7eYGa. There you will see a project map and learn how you can still leave a comment about the project with the N.C. Department of Transportation. NCDOT will consider all comments made by May 8 toward the project’s final design.

Several road projects are underway, in the planning stages or under consideration in Wayne County. We welcome these projects, the economic opportunities that enhanced traffic may bring and the avenues the projects open for growth in the county. When NCDOT wants to spend, we are listening.