Rain is expected before 4 p.m. today before changing over to snow as a winter storm makes its way across the state from the west.

The temperature will fall to around 30 by 5 p.m., with wind chill values as low as 19.

The National Weather Service says the chance of precipitation is 100 percent this afternoon with a total daytime snow accumulation of less than 1 inch possible.

Snow is predicted to continue into the night, mainly before 10 p.m., with new snow accumulation of less than 1 inch possible. There is an 80 percent chance of precipitation overnight.

The overnight low will be around 14 degrees.

Wayne County remains under a winter weather advisory until 9 p.m. as residents brace for the inclement weather.

The snowfall will be heavier near the Wayne-Johnston county line, according to the National Weather Service.

Counties to the north and west of Wayne County are under a winter storm warning and could get anywhere from 3 to 6 inches of snow.

The Goldsboro Municipal Golf Course Committee, Mayor's Committee for Persons with Disabilities and the Goldsboro Youth Council meetings scheduled for Wednesday night were all canceled in advance of the predicted weather.

A strong mid-level low pressure will track east across North Carolina this afternoon and evening.

The system will combine with an arctic cold front to bring snow along with very cold temperatures across the region. The snow will end this evening, but it will be followed by arctic air tonight and Thursday.

Black ice is expected on roads and walkways Thursday morning and will be possible Friday morning as well in areas where there is lingering snow.

AAA Carolinas is offering drivers tips on how to stay safe if the roads get rough:

Do not tailgate. Normal following distances of three to four seconds on dry pavement should be extended to a minimum of five to six seconds when driving on slippery surfaces. The extra time will provide additional braking room should a sudden stop become necessary.

Never use cruise control on slippery roads. If your vehicle hydroplanes or skids, you will lose the ability to regain some traction simply by lifting off the accelerator. It will be harder to recover from the loss of traction if cruise control is active.

Slow down and adjust your speed to the road conditions. Leave yourself ample room to stop. Accelerate, turn and brake as gradually and smoothly as you can.

Don't slam on the brakes. If your car begins to skid, continue to steer in the direction you want the car to go. Slamming on the brakes will only make your vehicle harder to control.

Use extreme caution on bridges and overpasses. Black ice typically forms first in shaded areas of the roadway and on bridges and overpasses that freeze first and melt last. Although the road leading up to a bridge may be fine, the bridge itself could be a sheet of ice.

React quickly. Watch the traffic ahead and slow down immediately at the sight of brake lights, skidding cars or emergency flashers.

AAA Carolinas also reminds drivers that cars are more likely to break down if proper maintenance has not been done on the vehicle.

A simple seasonal checkup could help minimize breakdowns and alert drivers to any issues their car might have.

"If you have no choice but to venture out into ice and snow, remember to pack an emergency kit and drive slowly," said AAA Carolinas Traffic Safety Foundation President Tiffany Wright. "However, if you really don't have to go out, stay home. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can."

Winter weather advisories for black ice will likely be issued in the wake of the storm, according to the National Weather Service.

Motorists are urged to go to drivenc.gov for up-to-date roadway conditions. Motorists are reminded not to call 911 or the State Highway Patrol Communication Centers for roadway conditions.

Real-time weather and road conditions, as well as winter safety tips, can be found on the free ReadyNC mobile app or online at readync.org.